Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Advice comes at a cost

This post is a bit of a rant, and also a warning to those embarking on this craft and seeking the advice of experienced or expert designers and builders.

No pictures in this one sorry.

I've debated whether to post this for a while, but recent events have compelled me to.

When I started this blog, I was completely new to designing and building amplifiers and valve gear in general. I was delighted to see all of the resources available on the internet, and I joined one or two of the more popular forums. After sitting and watching for a while, and reading as much as I could, I started posting up a few questions, and a couple of schematics I'd designed, to get some input and opinion from the wise and experienced folks.

The input and opinion I got was not quite what I was expecting or hoping for. In my mind I'd imagined that the experienced folks would be tolerant of – or even welcoming – to the newbie, and take time to give explanations or point to resources to further my understanding.

Instead I was the recipient of sarcasm, scorn and ridicule. Both on the boards, and in private messages. It became quickly apparent to me that the prevailing attitude seemed to be that unless you know all of the common topologies by heart, you have no business even picking up a soldering iron. 

My particular approach has been that I don't want to just find a schematic and build it, I want to understand how it works. I'll only build something I can describe the working of to another person. So I'm gonna ask questions... that's how you learn.

Besides the condescending remarks, another thing I had to contend with was opinion stated as fact. Some examples:

  • "Hammond Sucks. Edcor all the way"
  • "No audio circuit has any business using the 12AU7, it's so non-linear."

So one of the first skills I had to pick up was the ability to discern fact from strongly-held and expressed beliefs.

The next problem I encountered was a peculiar way of offering recommendations. The most recent example was concerning the use of a Constant-Current Source for preamp tubes. This particular recommendation was given to me in an email by another old-timer in a way that implied that any amplifier without a CCS is some kind of useless toy. When I questioned this, my question was taken as a challenge, and I received an insulting and profanity-laden email in return.

Here's the thing, though. If someone tells me I need a CCS - or any other such recommendation - they should expect me to ask why. This is not to challenge or disagree – but rather because I want to know the reasoning. I need to know if this is another opinion-stated-as-fact, or whether there is some basis for the recommendation. I want to know:

  • Why would I need a CCS?
  • What problem does it solve?
  • How bad is that problem?

This helps me build understanding and further my knowledge. I did not profess to be an expert in this area - it remains a hobby which I fit around a career and a family. I do strive to learn something from each project, and make each one better than the last.

To that effect, I have made a decision which I should have made back in 2016 and this is the reason for this longwinded post. From now on, I am receiving my knowledge from books, or the small number of personal sources I trust, and I recommend anyone else starting out do likewise. 

Either that or develop a thick skin against the attitude you're likely to encounter.

For my part, if anyone asks me for my knowledge, I'll happily share it without condescension, such as it is.





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